8. The Zichy ladies

- Adél (1788-1839), (16.OR-vá-36) vázsonyi Károly’s daughter, known for her historically very informative diary

- Anna (born 1821 as countess Stubenberg), wife of Frigyes Zichy (17.OR-vá-da-392), known as sparkling piano artist and composer)

- Antónia (1816-1888) (17.OR-ve-czi-166), married count Lajos Batthyány, the first prime minister of Hungary; had great influence on the society particularly in the pre-March period (1848) Picture 1,

- Crescentia (1799-1875, born countess Seilern), third wife of Károly II. whom she gave 6 children before she married count István Széchenyi (whom the Hungarians call “the greatest Hungarian” because of his patriotic initiatives, donations, books, policies and statesmanship) Picture 1,

- Eleonóra (* 1795, married to prince Lichnowsky) daughter of Károly I., her son got killed by the ‘plebs’in Frankfurt during the March 1848 events

- Ilona (1849-1878, (18.OR-ve-czi-1691), married to count Ferenc Nádasdy

- Júlia (born countess Festetics, second wife of Károly II. Zichy, ex finance-minister, she was one of the lady stars of the Congress of Vienna, where both king Friedrich Wilhelm III of Prussia and Czar Alexander I. of Russia courted her, the latter giving her the name of “beauté céleste”, she died during the delivery of her 6th child, Béla, see above

- Karolina (1818-1903) (17.OR-ve-czi-168), Antonia’s younger sister with whom she shared her activities in the pre-March period; Picture 1,

- Marietta (1911-20..) (wife of Domonkos, 19.OR-ve-szm-1b.453, born countess Bolza), member of the Maria Legion, imprisoned by the communists, known oil and water colour painter, impressive positive personality;

- Melanie (1805.01.28-1834.03.03), (….), 3rd wife of Clemens Lothar Metternich-Winneburg, the famous Austrian State-chancelor, reportedly a spirited and witty lady, however reportedly with tendency to hypocrisy and politically very conservative with influence on the events in the Pre-March period

- Paola (1810-1866), born princess Odescalchi, wife of Ödön, (the Maecenas), convinced Emperor Franz Josef to allow, as christian monarch, to exhumate her brother-in-law Jenő (the Martyr), who was hanged 1948 as traitor, but never officially burried, and to burry him in his home-church of Káloz;

- Zsófia (1790-1863), elder sister of István Széchenyi (“the greatest Hungarian”), wife of the “savious of Venice”, called “beauté triviale” by Alexander I, czar of the Russians during the Congress of Vienna;

- Zsófia/Sonja (….-1919), daughther of Mihály, the Painter, married Feledi Flesch Tivadar, pioneer of artistic flower-binding (virágkötésművészet) in Hungary